More Cocoa Programming For Mac

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Writes 'Aaron Hillegass new book, Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X, 2nd Edition, is a very helpful book for developers interested in getting not only their feet wet, but become totally immersed in creating applications using the OpenStep-derived API known now as Cocoa. Neighbours from hell torrent download. Don't dive in without knowing how to swim in C++/Java, however.' Read on for the rest of Spencer's review.

If you are a beginner, please consider Programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners. About Cocoa []. Cocoa is the name Apple Computer uses for their extended implementation of the OpenStep specification, first created by NeXT for their OPENSTEP operating system. Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X 300 Posted by timothy on Tuesday December 11, 2001 @12:30PM from the mixed-barrel dept. Michael Simmons contributed this review of what he claims is the best of the very few books out there for folks who want to learn Cocoa programming. If you’re developing applications for Mac OS X, Cocoa® Programming for Mac® OS X, Fourth Edition, is the book you’ve been waiting to get your hands on. If you’re new to the Mac environment, it’s probably the book you’ve been told to read first. /translate-dotnet-11-free-download-for-mac/. Avermedia launches the slim usb digital tv tuner for mac.

The best-selling introduction to Cocoa, once again updated to cover the latest Mac programming technologies, and still enthusiastically recommended by experienced Mac OS X developers. “Aaron’s book is the gold standard for Mac OS X programming books—beautifully written, and thoughtfully sculpted. Key parts of the Cocoa environment are designed particularly to support ease of use, one of the most important aspects of successful Mac apps. Many apps should adopt iCloud to provide a more coherent user experience by eliminating the need to synchronize data explicitly between devices.

Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X, 2nd Edition author Aaron Hillegass pages 450 publisher Addison Wesley rating 9 reviewer Kevin H. Spencer ISBN summary Aaron Hillegass new book, Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X, 2nd Edition, is a very helpful book for developers interested in getting not only their feet wet, but become totally immersed in creating applications using the OpenStep-derived API known now as Cocoa. Don't dive in without knowing how to swim in C++/Java, however. The author is no stranger to OpenStep, having worked at NeXT as well as Apple in OpenStep application development and training.

Cocoa

Currently, Hillegass teaches Cocoa programming for. Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X, 2nd Edition is written in a way that makes you feel like you are in a class. There are prerequisites you must know and understand before you can begin, and, as a good professor would, the author points out what you need to have and know before beginning. Happily, the author is quite meticulous and has generously provided useful resource links and help where readers may explore for their supplies and primers and the like. Essentially, anyone with a copy of Mac OS X 10.3 Panther has all that should be required--the Developer Tools CD contains all developer software and documentation necessary (the author notes in the book specific locations for key primers and references). If you are experienced in C++ or Java programming, Cocoa development will seem familiar enough.

Objective-C is used throughout the book (the author notes that development in Java is possible, but not recommended) for the various and numerous exercises. Cocoa development is made easier with Apple's Xcode application, however, Cocoa is not for the timid or novice programmer. This book is well-written and easy to follow IF you have a respectable level of C/C++ or Java development under your belt. The text, as well as its diction, is easy on the eyes and mind, and while this is a programming book, the author's voice speaks well, allowing you to feel as if you can ask the book questions as if you were in a classroom. Graphics and text are plentiful, but information is not packed on every page, so following along is far from drudgery. Each chapter does stack itself on information from the previous, so this isn't a reference book in the strictest sense.

This entry was posted on 15.08.2018.