Clusterdesktop Portable Howto Use For Mac

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  1. Clusterdesktop Portable How To Use For Mac

For those who use both Mac and PC. There is a way to run both PC and Mac portable apps on a USB flash drive seemlessly by creating a HFS+ formatted sparse disk image directly on the FAT formated USB flash drive. /wireless-mobile-utility-for-mac/. First there is a website for portable apps for Mac at where you should download Portable Firefox, Portable Adium, Portable Thunderbird, etc. And of course for PC users. Behind enemy lines.

Clusterdesktop Portable Howto Use For Mac

Clusterdesktop Portable How To Use For Mac

Portable Mac apps on a PC formated USB flash drive How-to. For those who use both Mac and PC. There is a way to run both PC and Mac portable apps on a USB flash drive seemlessly by creating a HFS+ formatted sparse disk image directly on the FAT formated USB flash drive. How to Format a Hard Drive on Mac to Work on Mac and PC. Three Parts: Opening Disk Utility Selecting the ExFAT Format Formatting the Disk Community Q&A You can format an external hard drive or thumb drive to work seamlessly with both Mac and Windows by using the ExFAT file system.

Second, format your USB flash drive as FAT (MS-DOS) if it isn't already. Third, on a Mac, go to 'Disk Utility' and select your USB flash drive, then go to File-> New-> Blank Disk Image. Type a name for it, select a place for it (your USB flash drive), select a size, but make it around the size of your USB flash drive so you have room on the disk image for your portable Mac apps. Then where it says 'Format:' select 'sparse disk image' and then click on 'create.'

After the sparse disk image you've created mounts, just drag and drop your portable Mac apps to it. When you're done with your apps, just unmount the disk image.

When you are ready to use your portable Mac apps, just mount the disk image again when you are using a Mac. Creating a sparse disk image means that you're creating a disk image that is not going to use up any free space on your USB flash drive until you add files to it. /adobedtmadobe-auditon-for-mac/.

Photo by Sharon Vaknin/CNET If you need to expand your storage space with an external hard drive and you use both Mac and PC, you'll likely run into a few obstacles. Hard drives advertised as being compatible with Windows and Mac OS may have misled you into thinking you could actually use one hard drive for both computers. You can, but not out of the box. Most external hard drives (HD) are sold in a format called NTFS, which is designed to work with Windows. Macs read and write to a different format, called HFS+. Another format, called FAT32 is compatible with both OS platforms. Here's a look at how the different HD format types function: FAT32 (File Allocation Table) - Natively read/write FAT32 on Windows and Mac OS X.

This entry was posted on 13.07.2016.